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Iceni Magazine | December 1, 2020

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Homeowners are turning to DIY to improve their wellbeing

Homeowners are turning to DIY to improve their wellbeing

Homeowners are turning to DIY to improve their wellbeing – saying it leaves them feeling relaxed, calmer and even stress-free.

A study of 2,000 adults revealed almost three-quarters enjoy the mental boost they get from completing home improvements.

One in 10 are left feeling less stressed, while 15 per cent are ‘calmer’ after nailing a DIY task in their home.

And two in five feel ‘satisfied’ after a spot of DIY, with almost a fifth going as far as to say they feel ‘relaxed’.

It also emerged the lockdown has been a driver for many to tackle jobs around the home, as being there more than ever means they now notice what needs doing.

But 44 per cent admitted they had no idea just how much work there was to do.

The research, commissioned by Ronseal, found doing DIY has helped more than two thirds combat boredom, while another one in three said it means they will have something to show for their time.

Painting has been the most popular task over the last few weeks, with 31 per cent giving their walls a fresh lick of paint, 23 per cent sprucing their fences up and 17 per cent getting their brushes out on the garden furniture.

A further one in six have filled in wall cracks and one in 10 have upcycled furniture.

Rob Green, from Ronseal, said: “A lack of time and knowledge can make DIY a daunting prospect, and as a result, many simply put off the little jobs that need doing, even though most will be a simple fix.

“But after a while, you become so used to seeing the problems around the home that you don’t even notice them anymore – especially when you are busy going in and out all of the time.

“This is changing now we are all spending so much more time at home.

“When you are at home 24/7, it becomes much harder to turn a blind eye to that bit of scuffed paintwork or the cracks in the walls you are now spending so much time
looking at.”

The study also found more than half (56 per cent) have cracked on with DIY during lockdown, with an average of four jobs being completed – although they also have four tasks outstanding.

Usually, DIY jobs are ignored for an average of eight weeks before finally being tackled, with a quarter admitting they caused more damage by leaving it untouched.

Before lockdown, a lack of motivation (48 per cent), time (43 per cent) and confidence (27 per cent) were among the biggest barriers to completing home improvements.

But 57 per cent of those polled, via OnePoll, admitted they now have ‘no excuse’ not to crack on with the jobs.

The study, by Ronseal which is partnered with the UK Men’s Sheds Association, found that as well as being able to tick it off their to-do list, 74 per cent said staying on top of DIY is good for their wellbeing.

The UK Men’s Sheds Association provides safe spaces across the country for many, including socially isolated people, to meet, share good times, learn and refine DIY and other practical skills together.

Charlie Bethel, chief officer at the UK Men’s Sheds Association said: “It has long been recognised that DIY can be good for your well-being.

“Our sheds are inclusive, welcoming spaces where anyone can get involved in practicing their skills and our movement continues to make a huge difference to the lives of our members and the communities that they support.

“Obviously our sheds are only operating in a virtual way given the current situation but our members are still DIY-ing at home to keep busy and we’re still keeping our members connected via our newsletter and radio station.

“It’s vital in these difficult times to keep communicating and reassure people that they aren’t alone.”


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